© 2019 by Mollie Wolf

 

I am attracted to guttural, heart-wrenching physical assertion, and performance that is undeniably real.  My artwork tends to be heavy, layered and full of conceptual nuance.  I have a practice in my creative process of unveiling the emotional circumstances of a situ ation—engaging the tension of dystopian scenarios, exploring the aftermath of tragedy, investigating the lead-up to an outburst.  To me, the context is so much more interesting than the plot. I am consistently drawn to the underside of the world we a llow ourselves to see.  I have a need to dive into the darkness surrounding us, because I have found that it is within the shadows where true beauty appears—beauty that has no right or priv ilege, beauty that is weathered and worn, beauty that has memories and depth, and beauty that cannot apologize for itself.

I engage in interdisciplinary and multi-media performance, utilizing technology and scenic design to create environments that contextualize, surround, and engulf the performers and audience.  I am classified as a multi-media performance artist; however, physical movement is my primary medium.  I believe that dance is the art through which we can most closely tap into the human experience—the human body stands vulnerably on stage, and is asked to experience, interact, witness, express, and relate to its circumstance. 

For me, there is no separation between art and life.  I bring my full self to the creative process and I expect my dancers and collaborators to do so as well—engaging our conflicts, flaws, and regrets along with our strengths, beauty, and wits in order to more successfully create an environment in which the audience is safe (and sometimes may even be forced) to come to terms with their full selves as well.  Human life is not easy—so why should art about human experience be easy?  Art is meant to challenge audiences—to push them to new levels of understanding within the world and within themselves—and as an artist, that is exactly what I intend to do.

artist statement

Photography by Mae Koo